CURRICULUM & COURSES

ICL Academy’s online school course offerings are designed and taught by experts in digital education, and span a range of subjects to help students learn and explore their interests.

Curriculum and Courses

ICL Academy offers an array of honors and rigorous courses to choose from, providing students an opportunity to explore their interests and build a strong foundation of life-long skills. Students have the option to join an array of Advanced Placement (AP) courses and may also elect to pursue International Baccalaureate courses.

ICL Academy’s curriculum empowers students to think critically and apply their knowledge in authentic ways through Impact Learning. 

By drawing on real-life examples, students are challenged to investigate historical connections, explore today’s physical and social environment, and solve the global problems of the future. 

All students engage in an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes curiosity, nurtures creativity, and emphasizes innovation. 

Students learn with others who are motivated and work with highly talented instructors in an atmosphere of collegial engagement

ENGLISH

English 6

In English 6, students learn to examine literature with a critical eye, becoming proficient in annotation, inference, and analysis. In this emerging process of close-reading, students examine the deliberate choices a writer is making in story structure, word usage, and character development. We also explore how authors utilize themes, symbols, and figurative language in literature. In addition, students examine a wide range of texts and develop an understanding of literature’s ability to utilize the vicarious experience to expand and enrich their worldview. Likewise, students begin to hone their craft as writers. Cultivating a strong foundation of grammar and vocabulary, students begin to experiment with figurative language, structure, voice, and tone in their own writing.

English 7

In English 7, students will learn to analyze texts, identify evidence, understand perspectives, and read for research purposes. Themes explored will include journeys and survival, identity, slavery, and the effects of screen time on the developing adolescent brain. Students will explore both fiction and non-fiction texts, sometimes within the same unit, to build a richer, more nuanced understanding of a topic. Units will include a variety of writing assignments, as well as more open-ended projects that allow students to make the learning their own. Vocabulary and grammar will be taught in context throughout the course.

English 8

In English 8, students will continue analyzing texts, identifying evidence, and exploring different perspectives. They will build on these skills to learn how to conduct research and develop an informed opinion. Themes explored will include refugee experiences, taking a stand, sustainable food, and divergent experiences in World War II. Students will explore longer fiction texts, as well as a variety of non-fiction texts to build a rich, nuanced understanding of complex topics. Students will engage in both writing tasks and more open-ended, self-directed projects. Vocabulary and grammar will be taught in context throughout the course.

English 9

In English 9, students use their close reading and analysis skills to think critically about the decisions authors make. A review of literary terms begins the year and sets students on a course of discovery that includes the reading of seminal texts like The Catcher in the Rye and Macbeth. These works, among others, help students understand complex themes and the relationship between disparate works of literature. Through an introduction to rhetorical strategies, students begin to craft sophisticated essays and speeches that take into account the perceptions of an audience.
**Honors Designation available for this course

English 10

In English 10, students are invited to appreciate an understanding of self through a careful study of literary and informational works. Students are asked to consider how the point of view is a method of interpretation. Death of a Salesman and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remain staples of sophomore English, with an emphasis on how Miller and Twain create tragedy and humor, respectively. Students use published writing as models to base their own original work, including a short story portfolio and a satire project.
**Honors Designation available for this course

English 11

English 11 exposes students to a multitude of classic and modern texts by a diverse array of authors. Students will be prompted to develop their writing abilities through a number of expressive, creative, analytical, and expository modes. As they read and write, students will acquire greater vocabulary proficiency and sharpen their critical reading strategies. They will be prompted to reflect on the varying imperatives of society and how language bolsters thought, community, and dissent. As the course proceeds, students will be encouraged to discover their own voices and be emboldened to express them.
**Honors Designation available for this course

English 12

In English 12, we will look back at some of the British English history that has gotten us here, however, it’s important for us to prepare for what lies ahead after graduation. The goal is to drive curiosity about our world, make relevant connections to inspire real learning, and create pathways to demonstrate your understanding of and appreciation for your education. Because student learning in this course is based on increasing independence, the focus is removed from traditional tests and quizzes and instead turned toward thoughtful introspection and observation. You will showcase your knowledge of a subject by writing, reading, and thinking about a variety of topics and ideas and using your voice as a means of expression. In this course, we will continue to build and strengthen your skills on reading, writing, and listening, which leads to critical thinking, understanding varying viewpoints, and responding thoughtfully and purposefully as a way to prepare you for what lies ahead.
**Honors Designation available for this course

AP Language and Composition

This course is comprised of the curriculum for a freshman-level composition course at the college level. The goals of this course are to develop student abilities as writers throughout a range of writing forms, with the intention of preparing students for upper division writing within a wide range of styles throughout their college careers. We will focus on expository, analytical and argumentative writing forms. This class will work with a wide range of genres and students will use and evaluate both primary and secondary sources in the research element of our process.
**Students will prepare for the AP Language and Composition College Board Exam throughout the course.

HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies 6

Students in the sixth grade will build on their prior knowledge of history by studying the people, ancient societies, and events that ushered in the dawn of civilization, as well as the special significance of geography in the development of the human story. Continued emphasis is placed on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of people, and their role in developing social, economic, and political structures that enabled ideas to spread and transform the world. Students will develop and engage in critical thinking by questioning and considering why civilizations developed where and when they did, why they became dominant, and why they declined. Students will analyze interactions between various cultures, identify their enduring contributions, and explore links that connect our contemporary world with ancient times.

Social Studies 7

Social Studies 7 covers American history, from pre-Columbian habitation to the end of the Civil War. The course seeks to introduce students to American history and critical thinking through overarching themes such as geography, socio-economical and political trends, and human migration. The course is divided into multiple units, some including: Native American Society, Colonial Development, Expansion of Slavery, Westward Expansion, Industrialization, and the Civil War. Students will practice making connections between current times and historical content.

Social Studies 8

Social Studies 8 builds on previous courses and covers Reconstruction to current events. The course seeks to continue students’ education in American history and critical thinking through overarching themes such as geography, socio-economical and political trends, human migration, globalization, conflict, and technological development. The course is divided into multiple units, some including: Immigration, Progressivism, World War 1, The Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression, World War 2, The Civil Rights Era, The Cold War, and Modern History. Students will practice making connections between their own times and the historical content they’re learning, and, where applicable, the histories, major players, taught skills, and thematics inherent to their passions/interests.

World History 1

World History I begins with the first human beings & settlements, and extends to the Renaissance around 1500 c.e. Because of the nature of the material, this course will begin with a brief overview on Anthropology and Archeological studies that help us uncover the past. The course will then delve into the world’s first great empires. Finally, the course will conclude with a brief overview of the events that led to the rise of European city-states, the Crusades, and the infamous bubonic plague. Students will develop an understanding of the effect of religion on societies, causes and results of major wars, cultural impacts of imperialism and global connections, and the role of government in the lives of people. Throughout the course, students will apply their skills and demonstrate understanding with project-based tasks.
**Honors Designation available for this course

World History 2

World History II begins with the 16th century, and extends to the present day. The content will build on the previous lessons from World History I, and will cover major topics such as: the Renaissance, Religious Upheavals, Exploration, Imperialism, Revolutions, World Wars, the Cold War, and major developments in the post-modern era. Emphasis will be placed on delivering content through a wide variety of resources to help students develop an understanding of “big picture” ideas and critical thinking. In doing so, students will apply social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Throughout the course, students will apply their skills and demonstrate understanding with project-based tasks.
**Honors Designation available for this course

US History

US History begins with the earliest inhabitants of the Americas and extends through to the 20th Century. Students will develop an understanding of the economic, social, and political history of the United States. The course will focus on “big picture” ideas, and challenge students to process knowledge critically rather than focusing on rote memorization of dates and facts. Throughout the course, students will apply their skills and demonstrate understanding with project-based tasks.
**Honors Designation available for this course

Economics and Gov

Economics and Government seeks to inform students on the basics of micro and macro economics, and give them a working idea of the working patterns and ideology of American representative democracy. Both semesters will involve significant work with current events. Students will engage in real-world modeled problem-solving exercises across eight units, which will help prepare them for life in America as autonomous citizens. They will also write one major paper per semester, which will require outside sources. Specific connections to the material can/will be made by drawing in passions and interests, such as the economic trade-off of going to college vs gaming professionally; or the impact of governmental regulation and oversight on certain performance-enhancing drugs. **Honors Designation available for this course

AP US History

To take a deeper look at US History, students in the AP course will take on the role of historians. Beginning with the earliest inhabitants of the Americas, they will sort through, group, and think about long-term historical trends. This analysis will extend from Early Colonization through to the 20th Century. Students will develop higher order thinking skills by using multiple perspectives to analyze recurring themes. Three specific frames will be applied to different eras: communities, networks, and production and distribution. Throughout the course, students will apply their skills and demonstrate understanding with project-based tasks.
Students will prepare for the AP US History College Board Exam throughout the course.

SCIENCE

Science 6

In Science 6, students will explore a multitude of topics in our year long Science 6 course. Using the NGSS integrated model, topics will include subject matter in life science, earth and space, physical science and applications of science. Students will have the opportunity to use both technology and hands-on learning strategies with at-home labs. The purpose of this course is to prepare the learner for future science subjects and to introduce them to thinking critically, while applying science topics to their everyday lives! Smithsonian Stories and CK-12 online text will be used to supplement online course materials.

Science 7

In Science 7, learners will be immersed into a wide variety of subject matter pertaining to life science. During this year long course students will explore plant and animal diversity, ecology, cells, genetics, natural selection, and human body processes. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and apply how the living world around them works. This course is designed to prepare students for Science 8 and Biology. Students engage in both asynchronous and synchronous learning activities. They will be working with peers during class and engaging in hands-on experiments at home!

Science 8

In Science 8, students will dive deeper into the world of physical science during this year-long course. Subject matter includes, but is not limited to the study of matter, the laws of force and motion, gravitational studies, atomic theory and structure, and the Periodic Table of Elements. For many learners these topics will be brand new and we will take our time introducing each core concept; offering both asynchronous and synchronous activities. Students will be assessed on various platforms which include online homework, project based learning and at home experiments.

Biology

Biology provides students all the necessary tools and guidance to learn salient biological topics using NGSS as a guide. The topics include, but are not limited to: brain function, plant systems, evolution, diversity, cell structure, and cell specialization. The pedagogical tools utilized include but are not limited to: flipped classroom learning, video learning, OpenStax textbook (and others) learning, interactive applet learning, and group-project learning. In addition to base topics, this course will cover modern events and how they relate to biology.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Honors Designation available for this course

Chemistry

Chemistry is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, molecular kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on real-life applications and projects and the integration of other branches of science. Applications to society, individuals, athletics, and the utilization of technology are included.
**Honors Designation available for this course

Physics

Physics provides students all the necessary tools and guidance to learn salient physics topics using NGSS as a guide. The topics include but are not limited to: kinematics, Newton’s laws, projectile motion, forces, gravitation,work and energy, static electricity, circuits, and wave motion. The pedagogical tools utilized include but are not limited to: flipped classroom learning, video learning, OpenStax textbook (and others) learning, interactive applet learning, and group-project learning. In addition to base topics, this course will cover modern events and how they relate to physics.
**Honors Designation available for this course

Earth Science

Earth Science includes many different fields, including geology, meteorology, oceanography, climatology, meteorology, environmental science and astronomy. This is an overview course of all these topics. Earth system science provides a physical basis for understanding the world in which we live and upon which humankind seeks to achieve sustainability. Included in this course are many applications of how the earth sciences have a direct effect on our lives. Concepts and skills are reinforced with an emphasis on real-life applications and projects and the integration of other branches of science. Applications to society, individuals, athletics, and the utilization of technology are included.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Honors Designation available for this course

AP Biology

Advanced Placement Biology will offer students an exciting opportunity to explore the subject matter of the living world at a rigorous level. This course is designed for those who are interested in challenging themselves in relation to Biology topics. The course will be designed from a micro to macro scale, where students will study each hierarchy in detail from the basic unit of life to the most complex. Students will need to apply scientific inquiry and critical thinking skills. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to Biochemistry, Cell Physiology and Processes, DNA, Genetics, Evolution, the Domains of life, Animals & Plants, and Ecology. At home labs and demonstrations of content mastery will be required.
**Students will prepare for the AP Biology College Board Exam throughout the course. Purchased lab materials are required for this course
**Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites for this course

MATH

Math 6

Math 6 is a full year long course that introduces students to essential mathematical literacy and reasoning skills. Students will begin by learning about integers, and extending this to positive and negative rational numbers. Students will then learn about representations using algebraic expressions and equations. The basic properties to simplify and solve equations will follow. The use of ratio and rate will extend to work with percents. An introduction to three-dimensional measurement and data representations will complete the grade-level topics. The course will incorporate real-world examples and illustrative projects to expose students to a wide variety of applications for these important skills.

Math 7

Math 7 is a full year long course that introduces students to essential mathematical literacy and reasoning skills. Students will begin by learning about the number system, including properties of integers and rational numbers. Students will then learn about Linear Equations, Proportions and Similarity, Linear Functions, Percents, Data Analysis and Probability, Volume and Surface Area, Measurement and Proportional Reasoning, Transformations, and Geometry and Spatial Reasoning. The course will incorporate real-world examples and illustrative projects to expose students to a wide variety of applications for these important skills.

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra will review the basic operations of arithmetic on whole numbers, fractions and decimals. These operations will be used in dealing with ratio, proportions, percent, simple geometry and algebra. As students master these basic concepts, they will move into basic algebra. Students will be expected to understand basic operations with integers, rational numbers, irrational, and real numbers; the use of variables; properties of numbers and of equality; solving equations and inequalities; problem solving; relations and functions; and polynomials.

Algebra

Algebra focuses heavily on functions, specifically linear, quadratic and exponential functions, expressions, equations, inequalities, equivalence, and statistics. Students will progress from analyzing linear equations and their different representations to systems of equations. Both will be used to model real-life situations and a range of techniques will be used to solve. To help students become mathematically proficient, classroom activities integrate three components of learning: conceptual understanding, procedural fluency and problem-solving. Each unit will also culminate in a challenging real-life application.
**Honors Designation available for this course

Geometry

In geometry, students will utilize visual and spatial reasoning to analyze geometric relationships and identify and justify these relationships through formal and informal proofs. Additionally, students will apply transformations, symmetry and coordinate geometry to problem solving situations. Students apply algebra skills and concepts to various geometric concepts. To help students become mathematically proficient, classroom activities integrate three components of learning: conceptual understanding, procedural fluency and problem solving.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Algebra is a prerequisite for this course

Alg 2/Trig

Algebra 2 is the third math course in high school and will guide students through, among other topics, linear equations, inequalities, graphs, matrices, polynomials and radical expressions, quadratic equations, functions, exponential and logarithmic expressions, sequences and series, probability and trigonometry. Polynomials will focus on the relationship of graphs, tables, and equations. Work will then extend to analyzing a wide range of functions and ways that they can be shifted in the coordinate plane. As functions shift to trigonometric representations work will focus on the unit circle. Each unit will also culminate in a challenging real-life application.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Geometry is a prerequisite for this course

Pre-Calc

Pre-Calc provides preparation for those students who intend to continue their study of mathematics, whether in the direction of the natural or physical sciences, or in the direction of the social sciences. Content emphasis will include: functions from an algebraic and analytical perspective including their application to real life models; trigonometric functions and their application; and sequences and series. Other topics may include matrices, polar coordinates, parametric equations, limits and an introduction to calculus.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Algebra 2 is a prerequisite for this course

Calculus

Calculus is a year-long course that focuses on the mathematics of motion and change. Students will apply skills learned in Algebra, Geometry and Pre-Calculus to learn new concepts to quantify the living world. Content emphasis will include: Limits, Differentiation, and Integration. By the end of the course, students will understand how these concepts affect their everyday life. Throughout the course, students will apply their skills and demonstrate understanding with project-based tasks.
**Honors Designation available for this course
**Pre-Calculus is a prerequisite for this course

AP Statistics

AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will use graphing calculators as an aid in displaying and analyzing data. The course will address four broad conceptual themes; Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns, Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure, Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation, Statistical Inference: Confirming models.
**Students will prepare for the AP Statistics College Board Exam throughout the course.
**Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 are prerequisites for this course

WORLD LANGUAGE

Spanish 1

Spanish 1 is a first-year course that introduces students to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and provides them with the cultural context to enrich second language learning. Authentic speaking and writing activities will give students the opportunity to practice greetings, respond to basic requests and questions. Topics include greetings, expressing likes, dislikes, and personal information as well as an introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will implement their knowledge through real-world tasks and personalized assessments. They will achieve a level of basic conversational competency and understand the importance of learning a LOT to interact in a globalized world.

Spanish 2

Spanish 2 is a second-year course that focuses on interpersonal communication through speaking and writing while providing cultural context in order to enrich second language learning. Topics include, expressing opinions, asking for and giving directions, and making cultural comparisons. Analysis of short documentaries and texts relevant to students’ passions will allow for a more personalized experience. Students will continue to develop their listening comprehension skills and make connections to home culture through authentic documents and popular culture.
**Spanish 1 is a prerequisite for this course

Spanish 3

Spanish 3 third-year course builds on Spanish I and II as students continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, writing and reading in target language. Students will review the basic grammar concepts and hone their Spanish comprehension abilities with authentic documents and real-world speaking tasks. By examining cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world and expanding their conversational skills, students will learn the benefits of being able to communicate in a language other than English in today’s multicultural world.
**Spanish 2 is a prerequisite for this course

Spanish 4

Spanish 4 is a fourth-year course in which learners will increase their understanding and production of cohesive texts composed of multiple paragraphs in the target language. Topics include current events and social issues, arts in the Spanish-speaking world, ecology and environment. Emphasis will be placed on refining and integrating advanced grammar into daily communication and also on comprehending the language as it is spoken by native speakers. Students will be involved in different discussions that will allow them to express and support their points of view. Written and oral texts will be produced in a culturally authentic way. Students will have to analyze changes in perspectives when cultures come into contact. In addition, they will be able to use language in formal and informal settings. Students will understand that second language acquisition provides the vision and skills necessary to be a global citizen.
**Spanish 3 is a prerequisite for this course

French 1

French I is an introductory course to the French language and francophone cultures. Six thematic units will be covered and each unit will include vocabulary and grammar related to the theme, as well as cultural study related to the theme. Themes include greetings and exchanging basic information, likes and dislikes, describing yourself and family, education, free time, and cuisine. Students will participate in a variety of learning opportunities including interpretive (independent reading and listening), interpersonal (speaking in French with classmates and teacher, games), and presentational (writing and speaking).

French 2

French II continues to develop basic concepts in French language and culture including French pronunciation, grammar, and culture. Students will enhance and further develop their use of French through a balanced development of all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The importance of communication and cultural awareness is stressed through a wide variety of activities (group/pair work, video, audio recordings, computer assignments, etc.). Themes covered in French II include clothing and fashion, at home, asking and giving directions, travel, celebrations, and cooking/shopping for food.
**French 1 is a prerequisite for this course

French 3

In French III, students will continue to develop their proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking by interacting with other speakers of French. Students will understand oral and written messages in the target language and will make level appropriate oral and written presentations. Students will communicate on a variety of topics using complex structures, moving from concrete to more abstract concepts. They will comprehend the main ideas and significant details of authentic materials that they read and hear. Themes covered in French III include high school, daily routine, narrating the past, the outdoors, health, and leisure.
**French 2 is a prerequisite for this course

Over 15 other foreign languages offered

Speak with an admissions counselor to learn more about our other foreign language offerings!
**Additional charges may apply for languages outside of French and Spanish.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Independent Fitness

In this independent study, students have the opportunity to set fitness goals for themselves and work toward achieving those goals throughout the school year. Each semester students will log a weekly fitness journal, reflecting on their progress and areas for improvement. In addition to keeping a weekly online journal, students will also submit the physical activity hours they completed, over a five week period. Students will be required to complete 60 hours of physical activity, per semester. This activity will need to be monitored and verified by a coach or personal trainer. This course gives students autonomy over how they choose to exercise and maximize their performance.

Personal Fitness

Personal Fitness is both an engaging and interactive course over the human body and fitness. Students will explore topics that include, but are not limited to, nutrition fundamentals, mental and physical health, human anatomy, athletic training, and emotional health. Students will be given the opportunity to learn about all aspects of fitness and apply it to their sport, hobby, and everyday lives! This course also requires students to complete various types of physical activity on their own.

YEAR LONG ELECTIVES

Leadership

Leadership is a year-long course with curriculum from the ICL Foundation, crafted to ensure that our work is having maximum, measurable impact in our communities. With over a decade of experience in creating impactful training that is relevant and accessible to global youth, we continue to transform student enthusiasm into authentic action. Participants of our lectures, training sessions, programs, and academies all build skills, discuss environmental and social issues, and come to see themselves as agents of change, not waiting for the right time, but ready to take action today.

Entrepreneurship

In this course year-long course students will study the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements.

Performance Psychology

Performance Psychology is a year-long course that will provide an overview of the field of sports psychology and exercise, which involves applying psychology topics to exercise, sports, competition and health. Topics will cover how sports psychologists’ work –at any level- with athletes and teams in motivation, concentration, and attention.

Coding 1

Coding 1 appeals to students who enjoy playing computer games and using their favorite apps. Coding will introduce students to creating the steps and computer language that tells games and apps how to function. Starting with drag and drop coding, students will start coding in a fun and challenging setting with games and familiar characters. Later in the course, they will move on to advanced challenges and specific computer languages, including Javascript and Python.

Coding 2

Coding 2 will extend students computational to a wider range of applications. The focus on problem solving and computing provides a highly interactive and collaborative introduction to the field of computer science, framed within the broader pursuit of solving problems. Students will practice using a problem solving process to address a series of puzzles, challenges, and real world scenarios. Next, they’ll learn how computers input, output, store, and process information to help humans solve problems. The course includes a project in which you design an application that helps solve a problem of their choosing.
**Coding 1 is a prerequisite for this course

Film Study

Film Study covers several different aspects of the filmmaking process. In this elective, we cover elements of storytelling and writing for film, camera work and cinematography, the film industry, and how to write, review, and analyze films. This course will help students see their favorite films in a new light, explore new films and concepts, and learn more about the career paths available in film.

Journalism

As a quintessential Introduction to Journalism class, at least in part, this course will ask students to write (and otherwise produce content) in a variety of different forms and for a variety of different audiences. In addition to gaining a strong footing in the fundamental elements of journalism and the journalistic process, students will gain experience with such new journalism platforms/formats as social media, podcasts, and blogs. Students in this course will become better writers/communicators, sharper thinkers, and more critical consumers of media. The course will also cover such topics as journalistic ethics, editing processes and symbols, the economics of journalism, source evaluation, and editorial responsibility. In addition to completing a large amount of polished writing, students enrolling in this course will be expected to read (or watch or listen to) a high volume of published work from professional journalists.

AP Art History

The AP Art History course will expose students to the nature of art as a form of expression in the wider world and its current context. This course will invite students to participate in and make interpretations of art theories; it will have them read, write and discuss the study of art throughout history and from around the world. Students will develop deeper appreciation for various forms of art representative of diverse cultures and its relationship in the modern day. This course will ultimately prepare students for the opportunity to receive college credit and placement into subsequent college coursework.
**Students will prepare for the AP Art History Board Exam throughout the course.

AP Computer Science

AP Computer Science A introduces students to computer science through the Java programming language. Topics in this course include fundamentals of the Java language, control structures, methods, and standard data structures. AP Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming and design using the Java programming language, and is taught using a hands-on project-based method. The curriculum prepares students well for advanced work in computer science, mathematics, engineering, business, and the natural sciences. **Students will prepare for the AP Computer Science College Board Exam throughout the course.
**Algebra 1 is a prerequisite for this course

SEMESTER LONG ELECTIVES

Business of Sport / Financial literacy

The Business of Sport/Financial Literacy is a semester-long course. The Curriculum will focus on (1) how a sports team, event, or venue operates through various forms of financial properties including, but not limited to: ticketing, sponsorship, promotions, etc. Media relations and how they can form a partnership with the entity will also be studied in this unit and is crucial to the overall success and image of the team, event, or venue.
(2) Learning basic financial concepts from an athlete’s standpoint including financial goal setting and the specifics of creating, implementing, and maintaining a financial freedom plan. Topics to include, but not limited to: personal financial planning, saving, budgeting, banking, credit, debt, insurance, investments, taxes, building your brand, and post career opportunities will also be studied.

Philosophy

This project-based course explores fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy over the course of a semester. We will learn about different schools of philosophy from both Western and Eastern history, and use this research to discuss some of the challenging and interesting questions about existence. Through a survey of different times and thinkers ranging from Ancient Greece, to existentialism, to Zen Buddhism, we will learn how different societies and times in history tried to understand the world. Some questions we will explore in this class include: Can we know what we see is real? Are we made up of more than just memories? Is it possible to know good from evil?

Fine Arts

This project based course is a semester of brief, yet saturated, creative experience set up to promote studio skills, art appreciation, critical thinking, and exposure to a wide variety of materials and techniques. Students learn about elements of design and composition through art appreciation and art history. This course will end with a culminating project to showcase student work and research.

Graphic Design

This digital graphic design course is for anyone interested in design and digital programs. You will work with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator to complete a series of small projects. You will learn the basics behind design, photo editing, and branding. In a world dominated by digital processes and advertising, learning about graphic design is key.

DUAL ENROLLMENT

Over 25 College Courses Offered!

Speak with an admissions counselor to learn more about our college course offerings!
**Additional charges may apply for college level courses.